Monday, 2 February 2015

More websites that cover the history of Eton Wick

The Eton Wick page on British History on-line



Bell Farm, 500 yards N.W. of the Church of St. John the Baptist, is a two-storeyed house, timber-framed, with brick filling, built in the second half of the 14th century, with subsequent additions and alterations. The house is of especial interest, as the complete plan of a mediƦval domestic structure of wood has been preserved. Read more......

Eton Wick history on Wikipedia 


After the construction of Eton College in the 15th century, a small group of houses were built immediately west to the college grounds. Making up the homes of shoemakers, tailors, and other workers who worked in the college. The hamlet was physically separated from the rest of Eton by land owned by the college, and was known as the wick   Read more...... 

Eton Wick history on BBC.co.uk



In 1986 Matthew Tipp wrote on Doomsday revisited. "I am 11 years old. I live in a 3 bedroom semi - detached house. Most of my time is taken up with school and Scouts". Read more......

Eton Wick on Workhouses.org.uk 



Eton Poor Law Union officially came into existence on 25th March 1835. Its operation was overseen by an elected Board of Guardians, 22 in number, representing its 19 constituent parishes as listed below (figures in brackets indicate numbers of Guardians if more than one): Buckinghamshire: Burnham, Datchet, Denham, Dorney, Eton (2), Farnham Royal, Fulmer, Hedgerley, Hedgerley Dean, Hitcham, Horton, Iver (2), Langley Marish (2), Lower Boveney, Stoke Poges, Taplow, Upton with Chalvey, Wexham, Wyrardisbury (or Wraysbury). Later Additions: Eton Wick (from 1894), Gerrard's Cross (from 1895), Slough (from 1894), Stoke in Slough (1894-96) Read more.......

 

Victorian floods  



The Eton College playing fields, the Brocas and the neighbouring meadows, the ground about the Provost's Fishing Lodge at Black Potts, and Romney Isle, below the bridge, with a vast extent of land at Chalvey, Eton Wick, and Dorney, were submerged. Read more......

 

Eton Wick History on Pastscape.org.uk



The site of an Early Neolithic causewayed enclosure at Eton Wick. It lies on gravels less than 1 km from the present north bank of the Thames. Its identification was confirmed by small-scale excavation and fieldwalking in 1984-5. Air photographs show three concentric arcs of causewayed ditch. Read more.....

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